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Fergana region

Fergana region borders with Namangan and Andijan regions, the Republics of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Scientists note that the word "Fergana" was written in the early Middle Ages in the Sogdian script in the forms "Pargana", "Pragana" and in Indo-Sanskrit "small region"; in Persian means "valley between mountains", "closed valley".

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Namangan region

It is believed that the name "Namangan" comes from the Persian "Namak kan" - "salt mine". The city of Namangan dates back to the 17th century, when a settlement of local salt miners (naman cann) arose in the north of the Fergana Valley. In the 17th century, after a devastating earthquake, the inhabitants of Aksikent moved here. Aksikent is an ancient city that was once the center of the Fergana Valley.

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Tashkent region

Tashkent - known since II centuries BC. There are various names for this area - Shash-tepa, Chach-tepa. Since the 11th century, it has been known as Tashkent, which presumably means "Stone City".

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Andijan region

Andijan, one of the oldest cities in the world, is over 2,500 years old. In some parts of the city, archaeological sites of the 7th-8th centuries have been discovered. Historically, Andijan played an important role on the Great Silk Road. The city is known in India as the birthplace of Babur, the founder of the Mongol Empire. Zakhiriddin Muhammad Babur wrote in the world famous "Boburnom" that Andijan is the center of the Fergana region. The fortress in Andijan was one of the three largest in Central Asia (after Samarkand and Shakhrisabz).

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Bukhara region

Bukhara is one of the oldest cities in Central Asia, the administrative center of the Bukhara region of Uzbekistan; a real architectural, historical and cultural reserve, which has preserved the unique architectural monuments of all historical eras, starting from the 9th century. In the developed Middle Ages, it was the centre of culture, science and Muslim theology of the entire Middle and Near East.

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Samarkand region

During the reign of Timur (Tamerlane) and the Timurids (1370-1499), Samarkand was the capital of his empire. The vast majority of the city's current architectural masterpieces were built during this era. It was the period of the highest development of Samarkand. Timur zealously took care of the prosperity of his capital, which he wanted to see as the capital of the world. Craft and trade developed largely due to forcibly brought in masters from the conquered countries.

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Jizzakh region

Jizzakh emerged during the Samanids era in the 10th century. Then it was part of the states headed by the Turkic dynasties of the Karakhanids and Anushteginids-Khorezmshahs. In 1220 it was captured by the Mongols and was part of the Chagatai ulus. Since 1370, it became part of the empire of Amir Temur, and later - the state of Mirzo Ulugbek. In the XVI-XVIII centuries, the territory of the modern Jizzakh region was part of the Uzbek states of the Sheibanids and Ashtarkhanids - the Bukhara Khanate.

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Navoiy region

The city was founded in 1958 and was part of the Bukhara region. It was created as a center of the mining industry for the extraction of rare earth elements, precious metals and uranium in the Uzbek SSR. In 1958, the construction of a mining and smelting plant began in the area of ​​​​the village of Karmana. And a new city was founded, which was named Navoi in honor of the famous Uzbek poet and philosopher Alisher Navoi.

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Kashkadarya region

Kashkadarya is a river in the Sughd region of Tajikistan and the Kashkadarya region of Uzbekistan. An ancient tributary of the Zeravshan. In the initial section of the current it is called Obikhunda, then - Shinacasai, in the lower course - Maimanakdarya. Employees of a special detachment under the leadership of Ya. G. Gulyamov proved that Kashkadarya periodically flowed into the Zeravshan, into its lower reaches, until the XII century. Later, the ancient tributary of the Kashkadarya, flowing into the Zeravshan near the ancient settlement of Paikend, was traced and mapped by A. R. Mukhamedzhanov.

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Surhandarya region

Surkhandarya region is a region of the Republic of Uzbekistan. It was created on March 6, 1941. It was annexed to the Kashkadarya region on January 25, 1960. Reorganized in February 1964. It is located in the south-east of the republic. The name of the region comes from the name of the river "Surkhan".

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Khorezm region

Khorezm region is located in the western part of Uzbekistan. It borders on the Republic of Karakalpakstan in the northwest and north, on Turkmenistan in the south and west, and on the Bukhara region in the southeast and northeast. Almost the entire territory of the region is occupied by plains and small hills.

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Republic of Karakalpakstan

According to historical sources, people in the territory of Karakalpakia lived already in the Neolithic era. The territory of the modern Republic of Karakalpakstan is a kind of "archaeological reserve", which now has over 300 archaeological sites. In ancient times, this territory, together with the modern Khorezm region and adjacent regions of Turkmenistan, constituted Khorezm.

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